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Demographics (7)

  • Population of Metropolitan Areas
    Population
    1 New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA19,831,858
    5 Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX6,177,035
    10 Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH4,640,802
    15 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA3,552,157
    20 Baltimore-Towson, MD2,753,149
    28 Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN2,128,603
    30 Kansas City, MO-KS2,038,724

    Source: US Census Bureau, 2012 estimates

  • Population of Metro Areas Within 200 Mile Radius
    2012 Population Estimate
    Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN2,128,603
    Dayton-Springfield-Greenville, OH800,972
    Columbus, OH1,944,002
    Lexington-Fayette, KY485,023
    Louisville, KY-IN1,251,351
    Indianapolis, IN1,928,982
    Muncie, IN117,364
    Lima, OH105,141
    Mansfield, OH122,673
    Weirton -Steubenville, OH-WV122,547
    Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH364,665
    Bloomington, IN162,399
    Fort Wayne, IN421,406
    Akron, OH702,262
    Canton-Massillon, OH403,455
    Toledo, OH608,711
    Charleston, WV225,954
    Elkhart-Goshen, IN199,619
    Evansville, IN-KY313,433
    Lafayette, IN206,412
    South Bend-Mishawaka, IN-MI318,586
    Terre Haute, IN172,493

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 Population Estimates

    map: Metro Populations Within 200 Miles

  • Number of Households in the Cincinnati MSA
    Number of Households
    1990655,900
    2000780,440
    2006801,736
    2012836,448

    Source: http://www.cincinnatiusa.org (Demographics)

  • City of Cincinnati Population (inside city limits)
    Population
    Estimated Population Figures 2007296,943

    Source: US Census Report, 2010

  • Cincinnati's Neighborhood Population
    Population
    Avondale12,466
    Bond hill12,466
    California469
    Camp Washington1,343
    Carthage2,733
    Clifton8,304
    College Hill14,133
    Columbia Tusculum1,304
    Corryville3,327
    CUF16,989
    Downtown4,850
    East End1,518
    East Price Hill15,340
    East Walnut Hills3,794
    East Westwood2,445
    English Woods405
    Evanston9,158
    Hartwell4,640
    Hyde Park13,356
    Kennedy Heights4,847
    Linwood875
    Lower Price Hill1,075
    Madisonville9,141
    Millvale2,399
    Mt. Adams1,481
    Mt. Airy8,779
    Mt. Auburn4,904
    Mt. Lookout4,814
    Mt. Washington11,711
    North Avondale3,229
    North Fairmount1,812
    Northside7,467
    Oakley10,429
    Over-the-Rhine6,064
    Paddock Hills959
    Pendleton900
    Pleasant Ridge8,083
    Queensgate142
    Riverside2,340
    Roselawn6,440
    Sayler Park2,765
    Sedamsville680
    South Cumminsville801
    South Fairmount2,368
    Spring Grove Village1,964
    Villages at Roll Hill1,916
    Walnut Hills6,495
    West End6,627
    West Price Hill17,155
    Westwood29,950
    Winton Hills4,787
    Citywide Total296,943

    Source: US Census Report, 2010

  • Cincinnati MSA Population
    Estimated Population
    20122,128,603
    20102,114,580
    20082,155,137
    20062,121,128

    Source: Census July 2006, 2008, 2010 & 2012

  • Age Distribution
    % of Population
    1-1418.7%
    15-197.4%
    20-2410.5%
    25-4428.4%
    45-5413.4%
    55-596.1%
    60+15.4%

    Source: US Census Report, 2010

Economy (26)

  • State Umployment Rate
    October 2013October 2012
    Ohio7.5%6.9%
    U.S.7.3%7.9%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (Seasonally Adjusted)

  • Retail Sales - Cincinnati MSA
    Sales
    Total Retail Sales$29,649,428
    Food & Beverage Stores$3,972,491
    Food Service & Drinking Establishments$3,553,605
    General Merchandise$3,016,127
    Furniture & Home Furnishings and Electronics & Appliances$1,515,167
    Motor Vehicles & Parts Dealers$7,253,337

    Source: 2007 Social Compact, Inc.

    Figures in thousands

  • MSA Unemployment Rate
    October 2013October 2012Change
    Cincinnati-Middletown MSA7.0%6.5%0.5%

    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

    * [a] Area defined as Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; Dearborn, Franklin, and Ohio Counties, Indiana; and Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, and Pendleton Counties, Kentucky.

  • Job Outlook 2006-2016 - Ohio Metro Areas
    Employment 2006Projected Employment 2016Growth # 2006-2016 Growth % 2006-2016
    Akron353,000368,00015,0004.2%
    Canton-Massillon185,500188,6003,1001.7%
    Cincinnati-Middletown1,075,3001,163,90088,6008.2%
    Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor1,126,9001,165,90039,0003.5%
    Columbus974,8001,046,20071,4007.3%
    Dayton422,100435,70013,6003.2%
    Toledo347,400359,50012,1003.5%
    Youngstown-Warren-Boardman251,300254,4003,1001.2%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services

  • Japanese Investment

    Japanese investment in Cincinnati USA comprises nearly 120 companies with close to 130 facilities and approximately 12,000 employees.

    View the Japanese Investment Map and Companies

  • Fortune 500 Companies Headquartered in Cincinnati MSA
    Rank *Revenue
    Kroger23$96.8
    Procter & Gamble28$85.1
    Macy’s109$27.7
    Asland321$8.2
    Fifth Third Bancorp361$7.1
    Omnicare416$6.2
    General Cable425$6
    AK Steel Holding430$5.9
    Western & Southern Financial Group471$5.3
    American Financial Group485$5.1

    Source: Fortune Magazine, May 2013

    *Revenue in billions
    http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune500/2013/full_list/index.html?iid=F500_lp_toprr
    Bold indicates companies located inside the City of Cincinnati limits

    map: Fortune 1000 Companies

  • Foreign Owned Companies
    # of Locations%
    Japan14830.6%
    Germany9519.6%
    United Kingdom5812.0%
    France408.3%
    Canada326.6%
    Switzerland245.0%
    Netherlands234.8%
    Italian153.1%
    Other4910.1%
    Total484100%

    Source: http://www.cincinnatiusa.org

    Foreign companies employ more than 45,000 people in Cincinnati USA positioning Cincinnati as an international trade center.

    Among these notable companies: BASF, Givaudan, Krupp-Bilstein, LaFarge, L'Oreal, Luxottica, Mitsubishi Electric, Munich Re, Nestle, Siemens, Snecma Tata Group, Toyota Motor Mfg. - North American Headquarters, Valeo, ZF

  • Exports by Country
    2009 Export Value
    Canada$3,538,186,040
    Mexico$1,863,181,699
    Brazil$1,311,941,623
    United Kingdom$1,244,433,472
    Other$7,530,930,765

    Source: International Trade Administration

    Cincinnati USA Metro Exports Value (2009): $15,488,673,599

  • Current Economic Indicators (Cincinnati MSA)
    October 2013October 2012Change
    Total Civilian Labor Force1,087,5001,092,200-4,700
    Employment1,011,8001,021,400-9,600
    Total Unemployed75,70070,9004,800
    Unemployment Rate7.0%6.5%0.5%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job & Family Services

    * [a] Area defined as Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; Dearborn, Franklin, and Ohio Counties, Indiana; and Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, and Pendleton Counties, Kentucky.

  • Construction Cost Index
    Index
    San Antonio, TX83.0
    Nashville, TN87.8
    Cincinnati, OH92.2
    Indianapolis, IN93.6
    Pittsburgh, PA98.9
    Kansas City, MO103.1
    Detroit, MI105.0
    Chicago, IL113.3

    Source: RS Means Building Construction Cost Data 2007.

  • Class A Office Space Rent Per Square Foot
    Rent Per Square Foot
    Dwtn. Cincinnati$23.20
    Sub.Cincinnati$21.50
    Dwtn. U.S. Average$39.00
    Sub. U.S. Average$26.00

    Source: Colliers International North America Highlights Q2 2011 Office

    Dwtn. = Downtown
    Sub. = Suburban

    U.S. Averages are weighted

  • City of Cincinnati Unemployment Rates
    October 2013October 2012Change
    City of Cincinnati8.1%7.1%1%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Bureau of Labor Market Information

    The City of Cincinnati unemployment rate only shows the unemployment rate inside the city limits.

  • City of Cincinnati Market Size
    Size
    Total Population378,259
    Total # Households170,680
    Population Per Acre7.4

    Source: 2007 Social Compact, Inc.

  • European Investment

    European investment in Cincinnati USA comprises nearly 250 companies with more than 290 facilities, and close to 30,000 employees. These European coutries include:

    Austria Germany Luxembourg
    Belgium Greece Netherlands
    Finland Ireland Russia
    France Italy Spain
    Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom

     

    View the European Investment Map and Companies

  • Cincinnati MSA Unemployment Rate (12 Month History)
    Unemployment Rate
    October 20126.3%
    November 20126.4%
    December 20126.4%
    January 20138.0%
    February 20137.4%
    March 20137.2%
    April 20136.5%
    May 20136.8%
    June 20137.3%
    July 20137.1%
    August 20136.8%
    September 20137.1%
    October 20137.0%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job & Family Services

    * [a] Area defined as Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; Dearborn, Franklin, and Ohio Counties, Indiana; and Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, and Pendleton Counties, Kentucky.

  • Cincinnati MSA Receipts
    Number of establishmentsReceipts ($1,000)
    Total for all sectors133,719 $5,549,281
    Construction16,375$791,332
    Retail trade10,838417,972
    Real estate and rental and leasing15,3181,362,544
    Professional, scientific, and technical services19,929765,866
    Administrative and support and waste management and remediation services12,314239,217
    Health care and social assistance11,440304,148

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Nonemployer Statistics.

    Nonemployer Statistics originate from tax return information of the Internal Revenue Service. The data are subject to nonsampling error such as errors of self-classification by industry on tax forms, as well as errors of response, nonreporting and coverage. Values provided by each firm are slightly modified to protect the respondent's confidentiality.

  • Cincinnati MSA Market Strength
    200920082007
    Personal Income (Thousands of dollars)$82,459,618$84,080,023$81,922,785
    Population2,171,8962,158,6432,148,315
    Per capita personal income (Dollars)$37,967$38,950 $38,134

    Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis

  • Cincinnati MSA Market Size
    Size
    Total Population2,128,603
    Total # Households805,714

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey

  • Cincinnati MSA Income
    Income
    Median income (dollars)$52,373
    Mean income (dollars)$68,161

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey

  • Cincinnati MSA Housing Occupancy
    Estimate
    Total housing units919,561
    Occupied housing units805,714
    Vacant housing units113,847
    Homeowner vacancy rate2.4%
    Rental vacancy rate11.3%

    Source: Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey

  • Cincinnati MSA Gross Domestic Product
    201020092008
    Cincinnati MSA (In Millions)100,59497,43298,688
    U.S. Overall (In Millions)13,071,50212,604,48712,825,351

    Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis

    Gross Domestic Product: Total output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States, valued at market prices.

  • Cincinnati Cost of Living Index
    2010 Annual Average
    Composite93.8
    Groceries96.4
    Housing 81.9
    Utilities103.8
    Transportation98.0
    Health Care95.8
    Misc.98.7

    Source: C2ER, Arlington, VA, ACCRA Cost of Living Index, Annual Average 2010

    The survey measures relative price levels for consumer goods & services in participating areas. The index reflects cost differentials for a mid-management standard of living. Taxes are excluded.

  • Central Business District Space Profile
    Square Feet
    Total Inventory18,544,893
    Total Vacant3,497,936

    Source: The Knowledge Report, Cincinnati, OH, Q3 2011, Colliers International

  • 2010 Median Sale Prices of Existing Homes
    Home Price
    U.S.$173,200
    Northeast$244,000
    Midwest$140,800
    South$153,700
    West$221,000

    Source: National Association of Realtors

    Median sale prices of existing single-family homes.

  • 2010 Median Sale Prices of Existing Homes
    Home Price
    Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA$114,800
    Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC$191,000
    Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, IL$191,800
    Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN (MSA)$128,000
    Columbus, OH$137,600
    Dallas-Ft. Worth-Arlington, TX$148,400
    Houston-Baytown-Sugar Land, TX$155,000
    Indianapolis, IN$121,900
    Lexington, KY$143,200
    Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI$170,600
    Raleigh-Cary, NC$217,600
    Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL$134,200

    Source: National Association of Realtors

    Median sale prices of existing single-family homes.

  • 2010 Cost of Living Index - Selected Metro Areas
    Composite
    Indianapolis, IN87.2
    Louisville, KY87.7
    Dayton, OH91.4
    Pittsburgh, PA91.5
    Dayton-Springfield, OH91.9
    Houston, TX92.2
    Cincinnati, OH93.8
    Atlanta, GA95.6
    Cleveland, OH101.0
    Denver, CO103.2
    Miami-Dade, County, FL106.0
    Chicago, IL116.9
    Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA140.1
    San, Francisco, CA164.0
    New, York, (Manhattan), NY216.7

    Source: C2ER, Arlington, VA, ACCRA Cost of Living Index, Annual Average 2010

    The survey measures relative price levels for consumer goods & services in participating areas. The index reflects cost differentials for a mid-management standard of living. Taxes are excluded.

Education (4)

  • Enrollment in area Colleges, Universities
    Enrollment
    University of Cincinnati41,250
    Miami University22,369
    Northern Kentucky University15,800
    Cincinnati State Technical and Community College10,995
    Xavier University7,019
    Ivy Tech Community College Southeast6,128
    Gateway Community and Technical College4,700
    College of Mount St. Joseph2,324
    Thomas More College1,886

    Source: 2011 Book of List Business Courier

    map: Colleges & Universities

  • Educational Attainment
 (MSA)
    Population
    High School Graduates465,390
    Some College270,773
    Associates Degree100,130
    Bachelor Degree248,208
    Graduate or Professional Degree141,027
    Total1,410,271

    Source: www.CincinnatiUSA.org

    Population Ages 25 & Over
    **U.S. Census Bureau Rolling 5 Year Survey 2010

  • College & University Graduates: 200 Mile Radius from Downtown Cincinnati
    Graduates 2008-2009
    Associates45,016
    Bachelors103,857
    Masters & Doctors45,055
    Total Annual Graduates193,928

    Source: National Center for Education Statistics

    336 Colleges and Universities within a 200 mile radius
    Total Enrollment - 1,097,688

  • College & University Enrollment: 200 mile radius from downtown Cincinnati
    Enrollment 2009-2010
    Undergraduate1,064,348
    Graduate159,243
    Total Enrolled1,223,591

    Source: http://www.cincinnatiusa.org

Employers (11)

  • State Umployment Rate
    October 2013October 2012
    Ohio7.5%6.9%
    U.S.7.3%7.9%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (Seasonally Adjusted)

  • Selected Wage Rates (Office)
    Average Wage
    Office Clerks, General$11.18
    Computer Support Specialist$21.29
    Financial Analyst$30.99
    H.R. Manager$36.97
    Computer & Information Systems Managers$43.73

    Source: Ohio Job Outlook, Cincinnati MSA 2004-2014

  • Selected Wage Rates (Manufacturing)
    Average Wage
    Laborers/Freight/Stock/Material Movers$10.58
    Shipping, Receiving & Traffic Clerks$13.37
    Welders, Cutters, Solderers & Brazers$16.34
    Tool & Die Maker$21.94
    Electrical Engineer$31.86

    Source: Ohio Job Outlook, Cincinnati MSA 2004-2014

  • MSA Unemployment Rate
    October 2013October 2012Change
    Cincinnati-Middletown MSA7.0%6.5%0.5%

    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

    * [a] Area defined as Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; Dearborn, Franklin, and Ohio Counties, Indiana; and Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, and Pendleton Counties, Kentucky.

  • Japanese Investment

    Japanese investment in Cincinnati USA comprises nearly 120 companies with close to 130 facilities and approximately 12,000 employees.

    View the Japanese Investment Map and Companies

  • Foreign Owned Companies
    # of Locations%
    Japan14830.6%
    Germany9519.6%
    United Kingdom5812.0%
    France408.3%
    Canada326.6%
    Switzerland245.0%
    Netherlands234.8%
    Italian153.1%
    Other4910.1%
    Total484100%

    Source: http://www.cincinnatiusa.org

    Foreign companies employ more than 45,000 people in Cincinnati USA positioning Cincinnati as an international trade center.

    Among these notable companies: BASF, Givaudan, Krupp-Bilstein, LaFarge, L'Oreal, Luxottica, Mitsubishi Electric, Munich Re, Nestle, Siemens, Snecma Tata Group, Toyota Motor Mfg. - North American Headquarters, Valeo, ZF

  • Employment by Occupation (Cincinnati MSA)
    Employees
    White Collar670,262
    Service217,598
    Blue Collar288,777

    Source: Demographics USA, 2007

  • Employment by Industry Sector (Cincinnati MSA)
    Employees
    Forestry, Fishing, Hunting & Agriculture Support11
    Mining249
    Utilities217
    Construction49,689
    Manufacturing120,508
    Wholesale Trade54,784
    Retail Trade117,266
    Transportation & Warehousing37,349
    Information17,092
    Finance & Insurance52,710
    Real Estate & Rental & Leasing14,027
    Professional, Scientific & Technical Services55,708
    Management of Companies & Enterprises25,163
    Administrative & Support & Waste59,223
    Educational Services16,074
    Health Care & Social Assistance124,672
    Arts, Entertainment & Recreation13,389
    Accommodation & Food Services88,902
    Other Services (except Public Administration)40,820

    Source: County Business Patterns 2005 U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Released 05/2007

  • City of Cincinnati Unemployment Rates
    October 2013October 2012Change
    City of Cincinnati8.1%7.1%1%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Bureau of Labor Market Information

    The City of Cincinnati unemployment rate only shows the unemployment rate inside the city limits.

  • European Investment

    European investment in Cincinnati USA comprises nearly 250 companies with more than 290 facilities, and close to 30,000 employees. These European coutries include:

    Austria Germany Luxembourg
    Belgium Greece Netherlands
    Finland Ireland Russia
    France Italy Spain
    Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom

     

    View the European Investment Map and Companies

  • Cincinnati MSA Largest Employers
    Employees
    Kroger Company*17,000
    University of Cincinnati15,162
    The Procter & Gamble Company*14,000
    Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center12,057
    TriHealth Inc 9,898
    Mercy Health Partners8,550
    Archdiocese of Cincinnati8,000
    GE Aviation*7,300
    Wal-mart Stores 6,932
    St. Elizabeth Healthcare6,839
    Fifth Third Bancorp*6,771
    Internal Revenue Service5,500
    U.S. Postal Service5,380
    City of Cincinnati5,303
    Cincinnati Public Schools4,854
    Frisch’s Restaurants, Inc.4,785
    Macy's Inc. *4,700
    Hamilton County4,676
    Christ Hospital4,355
    Miami University4,310

    Source: 2011 Business Courier book of Lists

    * Fortune 1000 companies headquartered in Greater Cincinnati

Key Sectors (8)

  • Life Sciences

    The Cincinnati area has more than 220 businesses with involvement in the research, testing and production of pharmaceutical, medical and agricultural products including:

    • Cincinnati Children's Medical Center
    • P&G Pharmaceutical, Inc.
    • Kendle International, Inc.
  • Information Technology

    Cincinnati USA profits from a robust and diverse IT cluster that includes Fortune 1000 companies, a strong network of highly-rated academic institutions, a number of global IT service providers, world-class infrastructure, and passionate, engaged IT leadership. Many notable technology companies were born in Cincinnati, including Bluespring and Hyperquake, as well as technology-enabled businesses such as Paycor and Convergys.

    Source: Cincinnati USA Partnership

  • Financial Services

    Fifth Third Bancorp, Western Southern Financial Group and American Financial Group are headquartered in downtown Cincinnati. PNC and U.S. Bank also have a major presence downtown.

    Source: Cincinnati USA Partnership

  • Consumer Products & Creative Services

    Driving Cincinnati USA's strong consumer services industry and its burgeoning creative services is a strong core of global companies like Procter & Gamble, Kroger's, and Macy's. As importantly, smaller, fast-growing companies like dunnhumby USA and Lightborne Communications are helping tell the story of the region's creative power.

    Source: Cincinnati USA Partnership

  • Chemistry & Plastics

    As a leader in chemical and plastics employment, Cincinnati USA is home to almost 300 businesses involved in the manufacturing of basic and specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; soaps and cleaners; flavorings; printing inks; adhesives, paints, and coatings; and plastics and rubber products.

    300 businesses involved in the manufacturing of basic and specialty chemicals call Cincinnati home including:

    • Barr Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
    • Kao Brands
    • Givaudan Flavors Corp.
    • Sun Chemical

    Source: Cincinnati USA Partnership

  • Automotive

    Cincinnati is a key part of the supply chain for many companies in the automotive industry including Honda & Toyota. We are a leader in light vehicle production, with Ohio ranked second nationally (1.9 million vehicles annually), in 2004.

  • Aerospace

    Aerospace firms have focused their attention on Cincinnati for over 100 years. From critical parts to the NASA space missions, to the world's leading manufacturer of large jet engines, Cincinnati boasts a skilled workforce, experienced professionals, and significant technology strengths.

  • Advanced Energy

    Supported by a strong commitment at the federal and state levels, our region is poised to take advantage of the fast-growing alternative and renewable energy industry. From wind and solar to fuel cells and biofuels, Ohio and the region provide outstanding access to capital and talent for this emerging industry.

    Source: Cincinnati USA Partnership

Regional Partners (8)

  • Uptown Consortium
    Spirited shopping. - Eclectic dining. - Top-notch entertainment. - World-class education and health care. These reasons and more are why Uptown is Cincinnati's newest up-and-coming neighborhood! Undergoing a robust revitalization, Uptown offers a myriad of possibilities to those looking for something out of the ordinary.


    629 Oak Street, Suite 306
    Cincinnati, Ohio 45206
    Phone: 513.861.8726 x15
    Contact: Tony Brown, President & CEO

  • Cincinnati USA Regional Partnership
    The Partnership is responsible for attracting new business, jobs and investment to the 3-state, 15-county region at the intersection of Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana in the Midwest region of the United States. This is achieved by marketing the region domestically and internationally, generating and managing prospects, identifying retention issues and opportunities and partnering with local communities to win projects.

    441 Vine Street, Suite 300
    Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
    Phone: 513.579.3100
    Contact: Denyse Ferguson, Executive Director

  • Port of Greater Cincinnati
    The Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority partners with local communities to facilitate economic development within the City of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Ohio. This important work enhances the use of the land resources throughout the area, resulting in the retention and generation of jobs and the generation of additional tax revenues.


    1014 Vine Street, Suite 1440
    Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
    Phone: 513.621.3000
    Contact: Kim Satzger, President

  • JobsOhio
    JobsOhio is a private, nonprofit corporation guided a highly accomplished board of directors, designed to lead Ohio’s job-creation efforts by singularly focusing on attracting and retaining jobs, with an emphasis on strategic industry sectors.

    41 S. High Street, Suite 1500
    Columbus, Ohio 43215
    Phone: 614-224-6446
    Contact: Mark Kvamme, President and Interim Chief Investment Officer

  • Hamilton County Development Company
    Hamilton County Development Co., Inc. (HCDC) commenced operations in 1983 as a private not-for-profit corporation, with one full-time employee and a volunteer board of directors. Today, HCDC ranks 48th out of the approximately 300 Certified Development Companies (CDC) across the country, and is the only such entity which includes three distinct programs to promote economic development

    1776 Mentor Avenue
    Cincinnati, OH 45212
    Phone: 513.631.8292
    Contact: Harry Blanton, Vice President

  • Duke Energy
    Duke Energy's Cincinnati USA Economic Development group is committed to enhancing the economic vitality of the communities we serve in Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky. Our economic development activities focus on strengthening our local communities by providing a strong business climate and employment opportunities.

    P.O. Box 960
    Mail Drop EA503
    Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
    Phone: 513.419.5972
    Contact: David Smith, Director, Ohio/Kentucky Economic Development

  • Downtown Cincinnati Incorporated
    Downtown Cincinnati Inc. (DCI) is a non-profit business organization with a mission to build a dynamic metropolitan center valued as the heart of the region. The organization is funded by a Special Improvement District that includes all property within the boundaries of Eggleston Avenue on the east, Central Parkway on the north, Central Avenue on the west (including the Centennial buildings), and the river on the south (excluding the two stadiums). DCI provides leadership and advocacy for important issues that ensure long-term downtown vitality, and plays an important role in working with strong partners to improve the city.

    617 Vine Street, Suite 1200
    Cincinnati, OH 45202
    Phone: 513.421.4440
    Contact: David Ginsburg, President & CEO

  • Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation (3CDC)
    The formation of 3CDC was recommended by a City of Cincinnati Economic Development Task Force. Its operations are funded privately, through business contributions as well as support from foundations and other philanthropic sources. 3CDC works collaboratively with its corporate partners as well as the City of Cincinnati and the state of Ohio.

    1014 Vine Street, Suite 1420
    Cincinnati, OH 45202
    Phone: 513.621.4400
    Contact: Steve Leeper, President & CEO

Transportation (15)

  • Transportation Services Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport
    2008 Annual Average2007 Annual Average% Change
    Passengers13,630,44315,736,220-13.29
    Air Freight (tons)19,80518,9954.26

    Source: Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport

  • Railroad

    Cincinnati USA is a vital gateway both north/south and east/west. Four major railroad systems serve the region including:
    Amtrak, CSX, Conrail, and Norfolk Southern

    The Indiana and Ohio RR/RY serves Southeast Indiana and Southwest Ohio.

    There are more than 175 miles of mainline trackage serving local industry

    The Chessie System's Queensgate computerized yard is one of the most modern and efficient facilities serving the U.S.

    CSX and Norfolk Southern provide long-haul freight service through the region. Both railroads have major classification and intermodal yards in Cincinnati. Rail America provides regional freight service while Amtrak provides passenger service to Chicago, Indianapolis, Washington, and New York.

  • Public Transportation

    The Metro bus system links downtown with the surrounding suburbs of Cincinnati while TANK links downtown with northern Kentucky.

  • Port of Cincinnati Commerce
    Grand TotalReceiptsShipmentsIntraport
    Total, all commodities11,7689,1322,6315.1
    Coal4,2474,2425.0-
    Petroleum and petroleum products1,8371,5792553.6
    Chemicals and related products1,3271,31115.4-
    Crude materials, inedible except fuels2,1861,6505351.6
    Primary manufactured goods35033316.6-
    Food and farm products1,82116.21,806-
    All manufactured equipment, machinery and products1,0111,011--

    Source: U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Waterborne Commerce Data Center

    Freight Traffic, 2009 (thousand short tons)


  • Port Facilities

    The Port of Cincinnati is the 5th largest inland port; 52.3 million tons pass annually through Cincinnati and the Ohio River.

    Source: Cincinnati USA Partnership

  • Place of work
    Total
    Worked in state of residence93.9%
    Worked in county of residence85.9%
    Worked outside county of residence8.0%
    Worked outside state of residence6.1%

    Source: Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey

  • Passenger Rail Service

    The Ohio Rail Development Commission is working to plan and build the “3C” passenger rail line, which will provide service from Cincinnati to Dayton, Columbus, and Cleveland. Amtrak estimates that the 3C line will serve more than 478,000 riders in its first year of operation, making it the 12th largest passenger generator in the nation. In late January, the federal government announced that it is providing $400 million in funding for the project through the American Relief and Recovery Act, which is nearly the entire cost. To learn more, visit the Ohio Department of Transportation page.

  • Ohio River Traffic
    Tons
    2008230,800,000
    2006241,535,000
    2004238,980,000
    2002243,147,000
    2000236,304,000

    Source: U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Waterborne Commerce Data Center

  • Ohio River System Port Commerce
    Total
    Huntington, WV (Tristate)69.3
    Pittsburgh, PA41.8
    Cincinnati, OH13.4
    Louisville, KY7.4
    Nashville, TN3.3
    Chattanooga, TN2.2

    Source: U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Waterborne Commerce Data Center

    2008 Freight Tonnage In Millions. Amounts are rounded to nearest 100,000 tons.
    U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Waterborne Commerce Data Center

  • Mileage to Other Major Cities
    MilesKilometers
    Atlanta440708
    Baltimore, MD442682
    Charlotte, NC339546
    Chicago, IL287462
    Cleveland, OH244393
    Columbus, OH100161
    Detroit, MI269432
    Indianapolis, IN110177
    Kansas City, MO591951
    Lexington, KY78126
    Louisville, KY102164
    Memphis, TN468753
    Milwaukee, WI374602
    Nashville, TN269433
    Philadelphia, PA567912
    Pittsburgh, PA295475
    Raleigh, NC534859
    St. Louis, MO340547
    Toledo, OH200322
    Virginia Beach, VA491790
    Washington, D.C480772

    Calculating distances between cities:
    http://www.indo.com/distance/
    http://www.geobytes.com/CityDistanceTool.htm

  • Means of Transportation to Work
    Total
    Drive alone69.6%
    Carpooled10.4%
    Public transportation (excluding taxicab)10.6%
    Walked3.5%
    Bicycle0.5%
    Taxicab, motorcycle, or other means1.1%

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey

    135,445 total workers 16 years and over in Cincinnati

  • Major Market Commuting Times to Work
    Population (2008 est.)Average commuting time(min.)Rank
    Rochester, NY1,033,15520.371
    Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI1,550,45122.165
    Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC1,670,22523.4310
    Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN2,158,64323.7512
    Indianapolis-Carmel, IN1,720,79623.9315
    Las Vegas-Paradise, NV1,879,09324.6620
    Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, NC-SC1,706,46925.1125

    Source: U.S. Census Bureau's 2006-2008 American Community Survey

  • Interstate

    All major markets are easily reached from Cincinnati USA via interstate; 20 major metro areas within 400 miles (644 km) are served by one-day truck driving time and 30 additional markets by second-day service.

    • More than 900 interstate common motor frieght carriers service the region.
    • Over 380 general freight trucking establishments, of which 255 are long distance hauler, are located in the Cincinnati MSA.
    • More than 290 specialized freight trucking establishments in the Cincinnati MSA
    • 44 Freight Forwarders

    Cincinnati has 5 interstates that connect the region to the U.S.:

    • I-71, Louisville to Cleveland
    • I-75, Miami to Ontario, Canada
    • I-74, Davenport, Iowa to Cincinnati
    • I-471 and I-275 serve the regional market
  • Exports by Country
    2009 Export Value
    Canada$3,538,186,040
    Mexico$1,863,181,699
    Brazil$1,311,941,623
    United Kingdom$1,244,433,472
    Other$7,530,930,765

    Source: International Trade Administration

    Cincinnati USA Metro Exports Value (2009): $15,488,673,599

  • Airport

    The Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG) is located 15 minutes south of Downtown Cincinnati and is a hub for Delta Airlines. CVG has daily, non-stop service to more than 60 destinations, including service to the top 50 business centers in the United States. CVG also offers daily, non-stop service to Toronto and Paris. In addition to CVG, Cincinnati operates Lunken Airport (LUK), a general aviation airport providing services to corporate and personal aircraft.

    Air Courier Services

    Local courier hubs include FedEx and UPS.

Taxation (6)

  • Worker's Compensation

    Ohio worker's compensation rates are calculated by the Ohio Bureau of Worker's Compensation (BWC).

    The Ohio BWC classifies industries according to the National Council of Compensation Insurance. Each separate industry classification has its own basic premium rate.

    The cost of claims in each industry classification determines rates. Base rates are calculated by estimating the cost of claims expected to occur in the next year using costs of past accidents and diseases in each industrial classification.

    An employer's accident experience, fluctuations in payroll, medical costs, and worker's compensation benefit levels are primary factors in premium rates.

    For more information or a quote, contact the Ohio Bureau of Worker's Compensation Customer Service Center at (800) OHIO-BWC

  • Unemployment Insurance

    Employers must make contributions on the first $9,000 of each covered employee's wages. The contribution rate is 2.7%. For further information contact Ohio Department of Job & Family Services (614) 466-6282.

  • Sales Tax

    The sales tax in Hamilton County is 6.5%.

    Local Earnings Tax

    • The local earnings tax in the city of Cincinnati is 2.1% on individual income and net profits.
    • The City does not tax stock options.

    Real Property Tax

    Real property, or real estate, which includes land and improvements to land (buildings, etc.) is subject to property tax in Ohio. The taxable value of real estate is 35 percent of market value. The effective tax rate applied to the assessed value varies by school district.

    The average effective tax rate for real property in 2006 in Ohio was 63 mills.

    Real Property Tax Formula:
    (Actual value) x (.35) = Assessed value

    (Assessed value) x (local millage) = Real property tax

    For additional information contact the Ohio Department of Taxation's Income Tax Division.

  • Personal Income Tax (for 2008, 2009 and 2010)

    Reforms enacted in 2005 called for a gradual 21 percent across the board reduction in income tax rates. Tax rates have been reduced four times, and are now 16.8 percent lower than they were five years ago. A fifth rate cut is scheduled for 2011.

    The Ohio rate schedule is as follows:

    $0 - $5,000 0.618% of Ohio taxable income
    $5,001 - $10,000 $30.90 + 1.236% of excess of $5,000
    $10,001 - $15,000 $92.70 + 2.473% of excess over $10,000
    $15,001 - $20,000 $216.35 + 3.091% of excess over $15,000
    $20,001 - $40,000 $370.90 + 3.708% of excess over $20,000
    $40,001 - $80,000 $1,112.50 + 4.327% of excess over $40,000
    $80,001 - $100,000 $2,843.30 + 4.945% of excess over $80,000
    $100,001 - $200,000 $3,832.30 + 5.741% of excess over $100,000
    $200,001 - over $9,573.30 + 6.24% of excess over $200,000
  • Incorporation Fees
    Rate Per Share
    First 1,000$0.10
    1,001-10,000$0.05
    10,001-50,000$0.02
    50,001-100,000$0.01
    100,001-500,000$0.0050
    More than 500,000$0.0025

    Initial Articles of Incorporation minimum fee of $125 plus these fees if more than 1,500 shares are issued.

  • Commercial Activities Tax (CAT)

    A tax imposed on the privilege of doing business in Ohio. The CAT is measured by Ohio gross receipts and paid by business located both in and outside of Ohio, that operate in Ohio.

    The CAT is paid by any business with Ohio gross receipts of $150,000 or more in a calendar year. Businesses with annual Ohio gross receipts of $150,000 or less are not subject to the CAT. Annual Ohio gross receipts from $150,001-$1 million are subject to a minimum $150 tax.

    For Ohio gross receipts exceeding $1 million the rate is .26%. Out-of-state gross receipts are exempt.

    Replacement for the Ohio Corporate Franchise and tangible personal property taxes.

Utilities (5)

  • Water

    Cincinnati enjoys an almost limitless supply of high quality potable water, at rates among the lowest in the country.

    Greater Cincinnati Water Works (GCWW), largest of several water works in the service area, has been a municipally-owned and operated utility since it was purchased by the City of Cincinnati in 1839.

    GCWW has always taken the lead in water quality research and technology to protect public health.  It has been featured nationally for it's state-of-the-art water treatment and research. To ensure the highest quality drinking water, water is tested more than 300 times a day from the source through treatment and in the distribution system.

    GCWW supplies more than 48 billion gallons of water a year through 3,000 miles of water mains to about 235,000 residential and commercial accounts. GCWW's service area has grown to include the entire City of Cincinnati, most of Hamilton County, and parts of Butler and Warren Counties in Ohio.  In 2003, GCWW started selling water to Boone County and Florence, Kentucky via a pipeline installed under the Ohio River.

    GCWW uses the latest treatment techniques in its state-of-the-art facilities to remove harmful contaminants. Cincinnati has been recognized nationally for its excellent drinking water. GCWW has always met or exceeded all state and federal health standards for drinking water.

  • Telephone

    Cincinnati Bell delivers powerful, fully integrated, state-of-the-art networks supported locally by thousands of experts. Cincinnati Bell provides dedicated local account teams, strategic customer
service resources, and partnerships with industry leaders like Avaya, Cisco, Nokia, Motorola, EMC, Citrix, Psion Teklogic, HP, Nortel, Sun Microsystems, and Microsoft.

    In addition they provide:

    • Local SS7 signaling with dual switches
    • 87 switch locations and 99.9997 availability
    • 3,500 route miles of fiber in the Greater Cincinnati region
    • 640+ SONET self-healing fiber optic rings
    • 24 7 local NOC monitoring and technical support
    • 90+ NOC specialists
    • 500+ install/repair technicians
    • 3,000 employees based in Cincinnati
    • 135 years of experience
  • Sewer

    The Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati (MSD, or MSD-GC) serves the wastewater removal and treatment needs of over 800,000 customers in Hamilton County, Ohio (USA). MSD is currently implementing a multi-million dollar overhaul of the entire sewer system.

  • Gas & Electric

    Duke Energy is one of the largest electric power companies in the United States. They supply and deliver energy to approximately 4 million U.S. customers. They have approximately 36,000 megawatts of electric generating capacity in the Midwest and the Carolinas, and natural gas distribution services in Ohio and Kentucky. In addition, they have more than 4,000 megawatts of electric generation in Latin America. They are also a joint-venture partner in a U.S. real estate company.

    The company is headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., and is a Fortune 500 company traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol DUK.

  • District Energy - Cooling

    Duke Energy Generation Services (DEGS) was awarded an exclusive franchise to provide district energy service within the Central Business District (CBD) of Cincinnati, Ohio. Currently, a central plant and a satellite plant can produce 10,000+ tons of chilled water which is piped throughout the Cincinnati CBD to serve individual buildings with chilled water to meet respective air-conditioning needs. The customer base includes commercial office buildings, retail and hotel facilities, government buildings and institutional facilities. District energy services allow for lower construction and operating costs for new buildings, but they also allow older buildings to remain competitive by avoiding the expense of replacing aging cooling equipment, many of which utilize chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), a substance banned from further production by the Clean Air Act.

    • The higher efficiencies inherent in a centralized energy system result in substantial reduction of the air pollutant emissions caused by individual building cooling systems. This helps Cincinnati to improve its local environment as well as its business climate.
    • Duke Energy Generation Services can also offer on-site energy or commercial power generation management. Contact them for more information: http://www.de-gs.com/degs-contact.asp

Workforce (13)

  • Wage and salary summary
    200920082007
    Wage and salary disbursements (thousands of dollars)$45,630,395$47,656,335$46,737,400
    Wage and salary employment (number of jobs)1,075,4331,072,9521,024,556
    Average wage per job (dollars) $43,459$44,416$44,537

    Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis

  • Unionization & Collective Bargaining Agreements 2010
    %
    CBA - Total9.6
    CBA - Private7.6
    CBA - Public29.4
    UM - Total8.6
    UM - Private6.9
    UM - Public25.5

    Source: www.CincinnatiUSA.org

    CBA = Collective Bargaining Agreements
    UM = Union Members

    ***www.unionstats.com

    III. Metropolitan Area: Union Membership, Coverage, Density, and Employment by Metropolitan Area and Sector, 19862010

  • Total Labor Force Participation Cincinnati MSA
    % Participation
    Total participation rate68.4
    Men75.4
    Women61.7

    Source: Geographic Profiles of Employment and Unemployment 2004, U. S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics

  • State Umployment Rate
    October 2013October 2012
    Ohio7.5%6.9%
    U.S.7.3%7.9%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (Seasonally Adjusted)

  • Selected Wage Rates (Office)
    Average Wage
    Office Clerks, General$11.18
    Computer Support Specialist$21.29
    Financial Analyst$30.99
    H.R. Manager$36.97
    Computer & Information Systems Managers$43.73

    Source: Ohio Job Outlook, Cincinnati MSA 2004-2014

  • Selected Wage Rates (Manufacturing)
    Average Wage
    Laborers/Freight/Stock/Material Movers$10.58
    Shipping, Receiving & Traffic Clerks$13.37
    Welders, Cutters, Solderers & Brazers$16.34
    Tool & Die Maker$21.94
    Electrical Engineer$31.86

    Source: Ohio Job Outlook, Cincinnati MSA 2004-2014

  • MSA Unemployment Rate
    October 2013October 2012Change
    Cincinnati-Middletown MSA7.0%6.5%0.5%

    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

    * [a] Area defined as Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, and Warren Counties, Ohio; Dearborn, Franklin, and Ohio Counties, Indiana; and Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, and Pendleton Counties, Kentucky.

  • Job Outlook 2006-2016 - Ohio Metro Areas
    Employment 2006Projected Employment 2016Growth # 2006-2016 Growth % 2006-2016
    Akron353,000368,00015,0004.2%
    Canton-Massillon185,500188,6003,1001.7%
    Cincinnati-Middletown1,075,3001,163,90088,6008.2%
    Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor1,126,9001,165,90039,0003.5%
    Columbus974,8001,046,20071,4007.3%
    Dayton422,100435,70013,6003.2%
    Toledo347,400359,50012,1003.5%
    Youngstown-Warren-Boardman251,300254,4003,1001.2%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services

  • Enrollment in area Colleges, Universities
    Enrollment
    University of Cincinnati41,250
    Miami University22,369
    Northern Kentucky University15,800
    Cincinnati State Technical and Community College10,995
    Xavier University7,019
    Ivy Tech Community College Southeast6,128
    Gateway Community and Technical College4,700
    College of Mount St. Joseph2,324
    Thomas More College1,886

    Source: 2011 Book of List Business Courier

    map: Colleges & Universities

  • Educational Attainment
 (MSA)
    Population
    High School Graduates465,390
    Some College270,773
    Associates Degree100,130
    Bachelor Degree248,208
    Graduate or Professional Degree141,027
    Total1,410,271

    Source: www.CincinnatiUSA.org

    Population Ages 25 & Over
    **U.S. Census Bureau Rolling 5 Year Survey 2010

  • College & University Graduates: 200 Mile Radius from Downtown Cincinnati
    Graduates 2008-2009
    Associates45,016
    Bachelors103,857
    Masters & Doctors45,055
    Total Annual Graduates193,928

    Source: National Center for Education Statistics

    336 Colleges and Universities within a 200 mile radius
    Total Enrollment - 1,097,688

  • College & University Enrollment: 200 mile radius from downtown Cincinnati
    Enrollment 2009-2010
    Undergraduate1,064,348
    Graduate159,243
    Total Enrolled1,223,591

    Source: http://www.cincinnatiusa.org

  • City of Cincinnati Unemployment Rates
    October 2013October 2012Change
    City of Cincinnati8.1%7.1%1%

    Source: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services Bureau of Labor Market Information

    The City of Cincinnati unemployment rate only shows the unemployment rate inside the city limits.

 

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